connections | 12

a small experiment in linking peers + postings

the power of images

© ROBIN AVNIconnections|12MCDM, Cohort 12

From the daguerreotype to the digital, the camera has captured sports victories and wartime heartbreak, the mystery of distant worlds, and the escapades of the famous as well as the family. Some believe the photographic image has the power to steal one’s soul, and many might argue that is exactly what Facebook does when its many users upload more than 250 million images every day. Not to mention, the number of pictures posted to Tumblr, Instagram, Twitter, etc.

It would have been extremely difficult for inventors Niepce or Daguerre, who struggled with a variety of chemical concoctions while working to create what came to be known as photography, to have imagined the ease with which the average Joe or Jill could snap, pick and post; or how photography would become the creative tool of every man, woman, and child.

© LARRY C. PRICEThe fact is the image endures precisely because of its power powerful ability to capture a moment in time. This is demonstrated by the works and efforts of those featured in this issue. Veteran photojournalist Larry C. Price, is our guest blogger. The two-time Pulitzer Prize winner shares five great tips for being a photojournalist in the digital age.

Henri_Cartier-Bresson

Henri_Cartier-Bresson from Wikipedia

Cohort 12 has quite a few enamoured by photography in our ranks. Colleague John Hellriegel is using his iPhone to experiment with time-lapse photography while Adrienne Mills buzzes around Seattle and captures a rainbow of colors with her images. New photographer Sarah Reebs uses her blog tenthousandtakes to boldly experiment with the camera and embrace Henri Cartier-Bresson’s philosophy: “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”

So, next time you snap a shot think about all those other lost souls you’ll be meeting up with when you upload your image for the all the world to see.

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